Selasa, 20 Januari 2015

ScienceDaily: Allergy News

ScienceDaily: Allergy News


New cellular pathway triggering allergic asthma response identified

Posted: 19 Jan 2015 12:43 PM PST

A novel signaling pathway critical to the immune response of cells associated with the initiation of allergic asthma has been identified by researchers. The discovery, they say, could point the way to new therapies that suppress the inflammatory allergic response, offering potential relief to millions of Americans with the chronic lung condition and potentially other allergic diseases.
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Sabtu, 17 Januari 2015

ScienceDaily: Allergy News

ScienceDaily: Allergy News


UK trainee doctors still in the dark about potentially fatal allergic reaction

Posted: 12 Jan 2015 04:13 PM PST

UK trainee doctors on the frontline of care seem to be no better at recognizing and treating the potentially fatal allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis, than they were 10 years ago, reveals a small study.
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Kamis, 15 Januari 2015

ScienceDaily: Allergy News

ScienceDaily: Allergy News


Severe asthma: Diagnosis, treatment are inadequate

Posted: 14 Jan 2015 04:27 AM PST

Asthma is a common disease. In most sufferers, asthma can be treated successfully, and as a result emergency room consultation and hospitalization are rarely needed. However, in a minority of patients asthma can be only partially controlled, or even prove impossible to control, despite intensive treatment. In a new review article, researchers describe the points that require consideration when diagnosing and treating such cases, known as severe asthma, and the areas in which further research is required.
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Selasa, 13 Januari 2015

ScienceDaily: Allergy News

ScienceDaily: Allergy News


Towards a new wheat allergy treatment for children

Posted: 12 Jan 2015 05:29 AM PST

Most of the children that received a new oral immunotherapy treatment were able to eat 100 grams of wheat bread without side effects, a new study shows. This result has overcome the risk of accidental ingestion by patients with this allergy. This research could be the basis for large clinical trials with more patients with the aim of assessing the therapeutic benefit of this new approach. Wheat is one of the most frequent childhood food allergies (about the 35% at the age of 12). A common treatment of this disease is avoiding eating wheat products, although this can mean a nutritional imbalance for children.
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